We Tested Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut on 3 Different Systems to See How it Really Performs

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Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut — out now on PC, after its massive success as a PlayStation-exclusive game, is one of the most stable PC ports I have played so far. That’s not shocking, considering folks at Nixxes are behind this, after multiple successful ports in the past. Sony’s push towards PC gaming has been aggressive with games like Spider-Man Remastered, Horizon Forbidden West, and more. With God of War: Ragnarok also in the pipeline for a PC launch, things will get more interesting.

Ghost of Tsushima from Sucker Punch Production is a game set in feudal Japan. It’s one of the most visually stunning titles with amazing graphics that follow Jin Sakai’s journey. Considering the original game was launched for PS4, the PC port is not very demanding, but is GPU-hungry. I have tested this game across three different systems — two gaming laptops, and a PC. Let’s have a look at how it performs.

Ghost of Tsushima Directors Cut PC System Requirements

The official requirement lists four settings ranging from the bare minimum to the top tier. With the game set to ‘Very Low’ graphics preset, you can even use your dad’s Intel Core i3-7100 which has two cores and four threads. If you are looking at the higher end of the spectrum for the ultimate 4K output, you’ll need an Intel Core i5-11400 or an AMD Ryzen 5 5600 paired with either the Nvidia RTX 4080 or the AMD Radeon 7900XT. As I said, it’s not looking for CPU power, but instead depends more on the GPU.

Ghost of Tsushima PC specs revealed : r/ghostoftsushima

Compared to games like Avatar: Frontiers of Pandora, the Jin Sakai-led game requires slightly less space on your SSD. All the requirements are mentioned below for easy access.

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut PC Minimum Requirements for ‘Very Low’ Graphics (720p at 30fps)

Processor Intel Core i3-7100 or AMD Ryzen 3 1200
RAM 8 GB
GPU Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 (4GB) or AMD Radeon RX 5500XT
Storage 75 GB available storage
OS Windows 10, Windows 11

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut PC Recommended Settings for ‘Medium’ Graphics (1080p at 60fps)

Processor Intel Core i5-8600 or AMD Ryzen 5 3600
RAM 16 GB
GPU Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 or AMD Radeon RX 5600XT
Storage 75 GB available storage
OS Windows 10, Windows 11

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut PC Recommended Settings for ‘High’ Graphics (1440p at 60fps/ 4K at 30fps)

Processor Intel Core i5-11400 or AMD Ryzen 5 5600
RAM 16 GB
GPU Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 or AMD Radeon RX 6800
Storage 75 GB available storage
OS Windows 10, Windows 11

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut PC Recommended Settings for ‘Very High’ Graphics (4K at 30fps)

Processor Intel Core i5-11400 or AMD Ryzen 5 5600
RAM 16 GB
GPU Nvidia GeForce RTX 4080 or AMD Radeon RX 7900XT
Storage 75 GB available storage
OS Windows 10, Windows 11

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut PC Special Features

Ghost of Tsushima becomes the first game ever from Sony’s first-party clan to support PlayStation Overlay — this means you can now have direct access to your friends list, PSN trophies and more. Hitting the ‘Shift + F1’ buttons brings up the dialogue box for you to interact with.

The PC port includes the original game, along with Director’s Cut, an Iki Island expansion, and Legends mode. You also get full DualSense controller support with haptic feedback and adaptive trigger. The clash of two Samurai swords is very aptly felt on the controller, while the bowstring pulls demand more pressure on the triggers, this is very well executed. Besides all these, the game also has support for Ultrawide (21:9), Super Ultrawide (32:9) and even 48:9 Triple Monitor support for you to enjoy the ancient beauty of Tsushima.

There are a few more commendable things about this PC port, like the availability of Nvidia DLSS, AMD FSR, and Intel XeSS for upscaling purposes — so there’s something for everyone. It also has support for Frame Generation on both Nvidia and AMD tech, but for the former, you’ll need a 40-series card.

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut PC Graphics and Performance

Just like any other Nixxes port, you get a bunch of graphics settings to tweak around with for the most optimised output. The settings are both accessible inside and outside the game. It’s neatly divided into two different menus, one of which allows you to tweak around with the upscaling techniques, while the other is used to change the graphics presets. Changing these presets does not require the game to restart, which is a blessing.

The work on this PC port is highly commendable. I haven’t faced any major bug that would hinder the entire gaming experience. Even though Ghost of Tsushima does not support ray tracing, the textures and details in the reflection appear well. The forest-laid backdrop of Tsushima, along with the winds looks stunning on the screen.

Since it lacks an in-game benchmark, I tested the performance with the opening scene of the title, which is chaotic with fire elements and multiple enemies across the war land. All the mentioned presets below were tested with and without upscaling technologies to get a better idea of the performance.

The game offers five different graphics presets, ranging from ‘Very Low’ to ‘Very High’. All the tests were run at native resolution.

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut on Infinix GTBOOK

Infinix’s first attempt at a gaming laptop is the GTBOOK. The laptop is available in multiple different variants — for this performance test, I have the entry-level model. It’s powered by an Intel Core i5-12450H with 8 cores and 12 threads. This is paired with an Nvidia RTX 3050 (6GB), 16GB DDR5-5200 RAM and 512GB SSD. The 16-inch display runs at 120Hz with a native resolution of 1920 x 1200.

Infinix GTBOOK

Preset Upscaling tech FPS
Medium Disabled Average: 51 fps
Medium AMD FSR 3.0 and FSR 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 109 fps
High Disabled Average: 43 fps
High AMD FSR 3.0 and FSR 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 111 fps
Very High Disabled Average: 31 fps
Very High AMD FSR 3.0 and FSR 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 77 fps

Since the Infinix GTBOOK comes with a 30-series card, DLSS Frame Generation is not available on it, but AMD FSR 3.0 can be enabled for a boost in performance. I recommend enabling these upscaling technologies, as the performance gains are clearly visible. However, these also invite some quality degradation depending on the upscaling settings you choose. The pixelation around the fire in the opening scene itself is a clear indication of the same. Besides that, I also noticed a few artefacts such as ghosting if the movements were fast during a sword fight.

Ghost of Tsushima is a GPU-intensive game, and it took good advantage of the RTX 3050’s 80W TGP, almost maxing it out. The game ran well across these presets, with the ‘Very High’ settings testing the laptop’s limits when everything was disabled.

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut on Lenovo LOQ 15

The LOQ series from Lenovo is a fairly new category focussed on budget-gaming needs. The LOQ 15 has multiple variants on sale, the one I have with me comes with an Intel Core i7-14700HX which has 20 cores and 28 threads running at a max turbo of 5.5GHz. All of this is paired with an Nvidia RTX 4060 with 8GB GDDR6 VRAM rated at 115W TGP, 16GB DDR5-5600 RAM, and 1TB PCIe Gen 4 SSD. For the display, it comes with a 15.6-inch IPS display with 144Hz refresh rate.

Preset Upscaling tech FPS
Medium Disabled Average: 63 fps
Medium DLSS and DLSS 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 146 fps
High Disabled Average: 59 fps
High DLSS and DLSS 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 121 fps
Very High Disabled Average: 43 fps
Very High DLSS and DLSS 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 88 fps

The upgrade in components has clearly helped with performance gains. And, since the LOQ 15 comes with a 40-series card, we could take advantage of DLSS 3 frame generation too. The difference between ‘Medium’ and ‘High’ graphics isn’t major when it comes to framerates, the TGP also remained the same, so you can dabble between any of those without losing much on numbers.

The game ran fine without any significant frame drops even during fire explosions or battle. With everything set to ‘Very High’ the game demands a lot of GPU power, and this is exactly where DLSS has helped double the frame rates.

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut on AMD Ryzen 5 8600G

While we have seen how the game performs with the involvement of dedicated GPUs, it’s now time to see if an APU build can run Ghost of Tsushima at respectable framerates. AMD was kind enough to send across their Ryzen 5 8600G for this test. The 6-core and 12-thread CPU is built on the Zen 4 architecture and comes with a Radeon 760M iGPU.

While these CPUs are not meant to rival builds with discrete GPUs, it’s perfect for entry-level gamers who want to build a PC on a budget. Since this APU build is memory-hungry, I catered to a pair of Kingston Fury DDR5-6000MHz kit. Storage duties were handled by the WD Black SN850X 2TB NVMe SSD, which is one of the most powerful and quickest drives available for gaming duties. For the motherboard, I used an Asus TUF Gaming B650-Plus.

MSI G274F 180Hz Monitor

For the display, the MSI G274F 27-inch Full HD monitor handled all the rough work. The monitor has support for up to 180Hz refresh rate, 1ms response rate, and is also G-sync compatible

Preset Upscaling tech FPS
Medium Disabled Average: 28 fps
Medium AMD FSR 3.0 and FSR 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 60 fps
High Disabled Average: 21 fps
High AMD FSR 3.0 and FSR 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 57 fps
Very High Disabled Average: 17 fps
Very High AMD FSR 3.0 and FSR 3 Frame Generation Enabled

Upscale Quality: Performance

Average: 39 fps

Yet again, there’s no major difference between ‘High’ and ‘Medium’ graphics preset. With all the upscaling trickery disabled, the game renders about 28 fps, and the performance isn’t stable. However, after enabling them, the frame rates shoot up to around 60fps with a more consistent performance. The ghosting artefact was slightly more aggressive in the ‘Very High’ graphics preset when slicing away in a dimly lit place.

I saw the CPU utilisation hit around 50 per cent, while the iGPU still hovered around 98 per cent. The Ryzen 5 8600G paired with Radeon 760M can play demanding titles like this, but it requires you to switch to lower graphics preset for it to produce playable numbers.

Verdict

Ghost of Tsushima is available on Steam and Epic Games at Rs 3,999. For this price, it’s an excellent port that not only works well but also offers useful features that further elevate the entire experience.

The game also does not demand a lot for lower graphics settings, which will be an inviting offer for budget gamers. However, it’s worth noting that Tsushima demands a powerful GPU for higher settings — as we saw on the Infinix GTBOOK and the Lenovo LOQ 15. That said, lower budget builds dependent on the iGPU, like the Ryzen 5 8600G should also be able to handle the game well, provided upscaling wizardry is enabled.

Nixxes has once set the benchmarks high by porting such a critically acclaimed PS4 title for PC gamers. It runs clean, bug and crash-free, which is always a blessing to have. The inclusion of the PlayStation Overlay is also well-executed.